Elegance Director’s Interview

Here is what I’ve been working on in the motion/film world! I am also planning on a portrait component to the film so I can have a gallery show in SF to promote the documentary! Enjoy my self-interview.

Elegance

Learn about the film and the director!

Director’s Interview is up on the Indiegogo Campaign! Donate $10 or more to help finance the film!

View original post

Product Photography : Gustin Menswear

I had the wonderful privilege to work with stylist Hana Crumley to test menswear product styling and photography. It was a wonderful shoot and Hana was able to use all Gustin products for the shoot. Gustin is a fantastic menswear company in San Francisco, all handmade, in America, and crowd-sourced so that what would normally be a $269 product starts around $81. It’s a great idea, and I enjoyed photographing their products.  Here are some of the shots, and there is a full gallery on my website, where I’ll be growing my product portfolio. Here are two of my favorite shots.

Image

2014_04_06_Menswear0657_Gustin_AHP_final

Photography Career Rules to Live By

I came across this last December, and I thought I would share since it makes a lot of sense to me and I worked to apply this to the exhibition last Saturday.

Unfortunately I cannot recall where I found this, but it was contributed to William Hunt:

1. Be talented.

2. Be smart. Think. Don’t be a jerk. Be engaging. If you are determined enough you can meet anyone at least once. Take the situation seriously; don’t blow it. Take stock of yourself. Is the work fully realized and are you ready to approach museums or dealers?

3. Be focused. Be single minded. Be ambitious. Think in terms of the long haul and the full arc of your career.

4. Be clear. Be able to articulate what you are doing, not so much why are you are doing it but literally what it is. Rehearse what you are going to say. Keep impeccable records about your work.

5. Be ready. Have prints, have disks, have a resume, have business cards. Don’t tell me, ‘they’re at home’ or that you are ‘still working on them.’ Give me something to remember you by. Send a thank-you note, even consider mailing it.

6. Be full. Have a life. Teach. Get commissions, commercial work, stock, whatever. Get money, make love, be happy. It will inform the work positively.

7. Be active. Be your own primary dealer. Take responsibility for museum and magazine drop-offs. Approach collectors yourself. Develop a mailing list. Market yourself. Send postcards. Donate prints to charity auctions. Go to openings. Make friends with your contemporaries. Use them. Always ask to be referred. Publish or get published. Get patrons, mentors, advisers. Use them. Bear in mind that if you set your mind to it, you can meet anyone … once. It’s that second meeting that proves difficult. When you do meet that person, be prepared.

8. Be receptive. Take notes. Bring a pencil and paper to appointments. Do your homework. Know what sort of work galleries show before you approach them. Go look. Say hello, but be sensitive to a dealer’s time demands (unless you’re buying something). Have a sense of what’s out there.

9. Be merciless with yourself. Edit, edit, edit. Edit, edit, edit. Take out anything marginal. Make me hungry to see more of your work.

10. Be patient. Please.

– William Hunt